Earlier this year, Jansy teamed up with Vapur to create and exciting packaging to feature its cutting-edge, foldable "bottle" product. While Vapur's product is reusable, we have also seen the rise of flexible material in product packaging design. As Packaging Digest coined it earlier this year, this "pouch-ization" of popular product packaging-- mainly for food products-- offers companies a number of advantages and some drawbacks. Below, we take a look at a few critical points to remember when considering a flexible material for your product packaging.

It's Not Exactly New...

"Pouch" packaging has been prevalent in Japan for nearly 50 years. The 1970s saw more and more Japanese women entering the workforce and pouched, microwaveable food products brought a new level of convenience to busy families who no longer had a lot of time to prepare dinner.

...But It's New to Us

Presenting a product consumers are familiar with in a pouch—rather than a box or bottle—is still a rather novel idea here in the U.S. That is why we have seen a boom in new flexible pouch packaging, especially for food and beverage products. Flexible materials and unique shapes and designs can be a reliable way to subvert consumer expectations and separate yourself from your competitors.

Millennials May Be Driving Its Popularity

According to Packaging Digest, millennials' preference for convenience may be driving the boom in flexible packaging—especially now that about one-quarter of millennials now have children. As Packaging Digest puts it:

With less time to spare and more options than ever, consumers cite convenience as a consumer need that is increasingly addressed by the innovations offered by pouch packaging.

Flexible Packaging Can Be Environmentally Conscious...

In some very key ways, opting for a flexible plastic material for your product packaging is an environmentally-friendly choice for both you and your customers. Packaging Digest found that pouch packages use about 60% less plastic than other traditional packages and take about half the energy to produce (cutting down on CO2 emissions).

...But With Some Caveats

However, plastic pouches are not recyclable. The blend of different plastics used the flexible material itself does not fit into our current waste management system and the products also come with other components (straws, zippers, etc.) that make the entire package ineligible for recycling.

If you’re interested in exploring a flexible material option for your new product, then our talented and award-winning product packaging design team at Jansy Packaging is ready to speak with you. We've worked Starbucks, Kate Spade, Victoria's Secret, Sephora, and many other brands to bring unique and exciting packaging solutions to their newest products.

Want to learn more about the dynamic product packaging solutions we're ready to offer? Contact our team today.